Matchbox Twenty, Alanis Morissette and Mute Math @ The ACC

Matchbox Twenty
ACC
February 22, 2008
Maybe it’s a little early to consider the 90’s retro, but if you miss the days of flannel shirts and Dr. Martens this was definitely the show for you. Matchbox 20 and Alanis Morissette had some of the biggest hits of the day, but even in 2008 the 90’s nostalgia is where they seemed to stay.

The show started off on a high note with New Orleans indie-electro-rockers Mute Math taking the stage with their high energy show. The quartet did a four song set: “Chaos”, “Typical”, “You Are Mine” and “Break The Same”. The abridged version of their usual full length show may have cut down on the tunes but kept all the highlights including a rockin’ keytar, lead singer Paul Meany’s mad acrobatics jumping over and around the keyboards and feverish percussion during “Break the Same”. Mute Math’s new wave sound seemed to be the only new thing about this night’s show.

Canadian darling Alanis Morissette was a talented songstress decked in a pair of leather pants and a sequined top, which seemed to be transitioning into a new look for her, abandoning both the angry rocker and hippie personas she’d adapted on previous albums.

Starting the set off with her early tune “Uninvited” she swung effortlessly through her catalogue of hits. The hour-long set put a heavy emphasis on songs from her multi-platinum selling album Jagged Little Pill like “Hand In My Pocket”, “Ironic” and “You Oughta Know” but also threw in other hits like “Eight Easy Steps” and “Thank U”. Though the talented songstress managed to pen some of the catchiest and most insightful tunes of the 90’s her performance left much to be desired. Pacing back and forth on stage and occasionally flinging her hair about, I would’ve almost preferred just to listen to the CD of this incredibly talented singer-songwriter.

In spite of this, the crowd seemed to follow her along singing back some of the more popular Morissette tunes. But they really got riled when the singer-songwriter threw a pink feather boa over her neck for her YouTube-ed cover of the Black Eyed Peas hit “My Humps”. But in comparison, the handful of new tunes she threw in from her upcoming disc Flavours of Entanglement couldn’t compare to the energy of her past hits.

As much as I was disappointed by Morissette’s performance I was delightfully surprised at the performance from headliners Matchbox Twenty.

Rob Thomas and co. started off with something new – their latest single “How Far We’ve Come.” But again it was their catalogue of 90’s hits that really got the crowd riled. Launching into tunes like “Real World” and “Disease,” the charismatic frontman won the hearts of the appreciative crowd (especially the ladies judging by high pitched screams and cat calls coming from the audience).

The band slowed it down with songs like “Hang” and “If You’re Gone” in a set that was dominated by the band’s greatest hits. As they made their way through the show it became quite obvious just how many hits the band had in contrast to the new tunes peppered throughout the set, like the cheerful “I’ll Believe You When.” The band’s nearly two hour set was backed by an elaborate set of LED screens moving back and forth with appropriate images flashing across them.

The finished off the set with a high energy encore including hits “Push” and “Unwell” and a surprise cover of Naked Eyes’ “Always Something There to Remind Me.”

Though the evening was jam packed with hit after 90’s hit from a couple of talented artists all in all there was nothing spectacular about either neither performance. If you came that night expecting some 90’s nostalgia then you would not have gone home disappointed. But if you were coming hoping for a high-energy, passionate show, you’d have only gone home wishing Mute Math played more than four songs.


Writer: Michelle Garcia

Photo:Michelle Garcia

Proud Supporters Of:
   
Home | About Us | Contact Us | Advertise | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Site Map
©Copyright 2009 Soul Shine Publishing       Designed by: Peashooter Media